Cristina Gelan is the EJO’s Romanian Web Editor and director of the Department of Communication and Political Sciences at the Andrei Șaguna University of Constanta. Cristina Gelan was born on the 26th of June, 1978. She is a lecturer on the Faculty of Communication and Political Sciences at the Andrei Şaguna University of Constanta. She received a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy at the Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi. She then completed a Master’s degree in Theory and Practice of Interpretation and a PhD in Philosophy at the same university. Between 2004 and 2006 she was editor of the magazine Culture: The International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology, the magazine is quoted today Thomson Reuters (ISI), Arts & Humanities Citation Index. She was the Scientific Secretary at the event titled “Journalism Between Truth and Mystification” organized within the framework of the Andrei Şaguna University of Constanţa, and co-author of the study “Journalist Perception on the Condition of Journalism – Values and Quality of Journalism in Romania.” She participates in numerous national and international conferences and has published over 40 articles on subjects in her fields of interest. Cristina Gelan, Ph.D. Lecturer, Faculty of Arts, “Ovidius” University, Constanţa, Romania. Cristina Gelan, Cristina Gelan
Summary/Abstract: A research about symbolism and representation in the world of the Byzantine leads us to the identification of an aesthetic doctrine based both on the ideas of the important thinkers of the time and also on the artistic representations, which have created constitutive beliefs for memory and for social identity. We identify in this regard the ideological conceptions that have structured the collective mentality and determined the crystallization and the imposition of a cultural paradigm.An important role in this sense was played by the plastic representations of Byzantine art. One of the essential themes of this Byzantine art is to illustrate some aspects of the visible and invisible world. The Byzantine artistic representation does not reproduce or imitate earthly patterns, but tends to transcend the human world and to approach the divine. The subject of Byzantine art becomes the idea of the eternal and immutable world, which opens only to the soul or the mind, a world different from that of the perceptible phenomena of the senses. The perception of the human being changes: the human body begins to become more and more devalued, and the idea of the soul, whose perfection consists in delivering body and salvation, is glorified. We are talking about completing a theme that will contribute to shaping the Christian doctrine and will have an overwhelming role in the formation and structuring of the collective mentality for several centuries.

Cristin Gelan
Cristina Gelan

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Cristina Gelan

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Cristina Gelan

Cristina Gelan

Cristina Gelan

Cristina Gelan
Lector Universitar Doctor - Facultatea de Arte, Universitatea "Ovidius" Constanța
Cristina Gelan

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